QDo you eat your GMO foods?

Do you eat your GMO foods?

AExpert Answer

Yes! We have been breeding plants for thousands of years to improve certain characteristics, like yield, taste and drought resistance.  I am fine with all foods―organic, conventional, etc.―as long as they provide good nutrition and taste. I try to eat healthy and so buy a lot of fruits and veggies, as well as chicken and fish.  People are free to choose what types of foods they want to eat and buy for their families.  We are very blessed in the United States with the safest and most affordable food supply anywhere in the world.

Posted on August 5, 2017
I’m a genetic engineer. I’ve spent 30 years participating as a member of teams of genetic engineers, and I love your question. Most of us do indeed spend a lot of time inside the lab, but we’re not always sitting. Sometimes we dance!   Genetic engineering starts with an idea for a way to solve a problem, so I guess it starts with an understanding of the problems. In agriculture, for example, that means spending time to understand what’s happening on farms and... Read More
Answer:
Posted on August 5, 2017
Other than research, our work starts at the design of a plasmid vector that contains a gene cassette that we want to introduce in a plant genome. Once the plasmid vector design is completed, it is synthesized by bringing together several DNA components together thru a bio-chemical reaction. When the plasmid vector is made, the several components are verified by restriction endonuclease digestion reactions and/or thru DNA sequencing. After this verification is completed, the plasmid... Read More
Answer:
Posted on August 15, 2017
The first use of recombinant DNA technology, was created by Cohen and Boyer in 1972 with E.coli in 1972 and this article explains this advancement in biotechnology in greater detail. Here is an excerpt: “Their experiments dramatically demonstrated the potential impact of DNA recombinant engineering on medicine and pharmacology, industry and agriculture.”   Recombinant insulin was the first commercial product derived from genetic engineering techniques created in 1976 by the... Read More