QCare to explain GMO Marijuana? now that you are patenting it, you are fighting for its legalization? does monsanto approve or condone the use of marijuana? and why is GMO marijuana considered acceptable, while organic marijuana is not.

Care to explain GMO Marijuana? now that you are patenting it, you are fighting for its legalization? does monsanto approve or condone the use of marijuana? and why is GMO marijuana considered acceptable, while organic marijuana is not.

AExpert Answer

We don’t know of any legitimate GM Marijuana in development or in existence. Any rumored involvement by CBI or seed companies is “urban legend.”

AExpert Answer

Cannabis has definitely been genetically modified for the underground and “medical” markets, but not using the modern methods that get called “GMO”. The modification of the genetics of marijuana achieved using a combination of traditional breeding techniques and clumsy, “old-school” techniques like chemical mutagenesis and induced polyploidy. In other words, various enterprising people used toxic chemicals to cause mutations or used Colchicine to induce the plants to double the number of chromosomes in every cell. Some of these plants grew better and/or made more THC. That is why modern marijuana is so much more potent.

There is a long, completely unregulated history of using these techniques to improve legal crops, but such methods are far more likely to cause undesired and undetected additional changes in the plant’s genetics. Modern genetic engineering is a much safer option.

The Cannabis modification occurred completely outside of any mainstream company or regulatory scheme. In other words, Monsanto has nothing to do with this. There is one very legitimate potential application of precise genetic engineering with Cannabis. There are chemicals other than THC in marijuana that are very helpful for some forms of epilepsy. If the genes for THC production could be turned off, the resulting plants could be a good source of that therapeutic chemical.

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I’m a genetic engineer. I’ve spent 30 years participating as a member of teams of genetic engineers, and I love your question. Most of us do indeed spend a lot of time inside the lab, but we’re not always sitting. Sometimes we dance!   Genetic engineering starts with an idea for a way to solve a problem, so I guess it starts with an understanding of the problems. In agriculture, for example, that means spending time to understand what’s happening on farms and... Read More
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Other than research, our work starts at the design of a plasmid vector that contains a gene cassette that we want to introduce in a plant genome. Once the plasmid vector design is completed, it is synthesized by bringing together several DNA components together thru a bio-chemical reaction. When the plasmid vector is made, the several components are verified by restriction endonuclease digestion reactions and/or thru DNA sequencing. After this verification is completed, the plasmid... Read More
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