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Posted On: Wednesday, 3/05/2014 9:12 am
A: This is a great question. Cathleen Enright, executive director for the Council for Biotechnology Information, answered a similar question. Here is an excerpt:“There are a number of reasons consumers may prefer to purchase non-GMO. Many of those reasons have been expressed on this website, but concern about food safety or health shouldn’t be one of them. This is why we support voluntary marketing labels for those companies who want to distinguish their non-GM food from their GM food, and so... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 3/11/2014 2:46 pm
A: We invite you to learn about the purpose of GMO Answers at http://www.gmoanswers.com/about. Here is an excerpt from our About section outlining our five core principles; we hope it makes information about GMOs easier to find, analyze and experience:What is GMO Answers?GMO Answers is an initiative committed to responding to your questions about how food is grown. Its goal is to make information about GMOs in food and agriculture easier to access and understand. The members and partners of... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Saturday, 9/21/2013 10:21 pm
A: This question touches on an important issue that is considered for all new GMO crop plants when they are reviewed by regulatory agencies in the United States and around the world. For plants modified to be protected against certain insect pests, assessments are conducted to determine whether nonpest species, such as bees and other beneficial organisms (earthworms, ladybugs, etc.), could suffer adverse effects. In the United States, data from these studies are submitted to EPA. In addition to... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Monday, 12/09/2013 2:16 pm
A: Thanks for your question. The study you are referring to discusses insect-resistant (IR) cotton and herbicide-tolerant (HT) soybeans. You might be interested in two recent responses that answer similar questions. Plant genetics expert Daniela Brioschi responded to a question about insect-resistant crops and the recent worm infestation in Brazil. An excerpt is below: “The attack of insects, from planting to close to harvest, is a limiting factor for crop productivity, regardless... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Monday, 12/09/2013 2:16 pm
A: Thanks for your question. The study you are referring to discusses insect-resistant (IR) cotton and herbicide-tolerant (HT) soybeans. You might be interested in two recent responses that answer similar questions. Plant genetics expert Daniela Brioschi responded to a question about insect-resistant crops and the recent worm infestation in Brazil. An excerpt is below: “The attack of insects, from planting to close to harvest, is a limiting factor for crop productivity, regardless... Continue Reading

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