Environment

By • July 18, 2017

This post was originally published on GMO Answers Medium page.

This month, GMO Answers wants to give you a glimpse into the daily lives of some of our volunteer experts who provide answers to your questions about GMOs, agriculture and biotechnology. Ever wondered who grows the food you eat? Learn more in this first installment of our “Day in the Life” series, where farmer and GMO Answers volunteer expert Brian Scott describes how he balances farm and home life in a typical day.

 

Gmo, farm, biotechnology, agriculture, harvest

 

1.       Tell us about yourself – how did you decide to become a farmer?

I was born and raised on our family farm. It wasn't until my last semester of college that I decided not to farm. I ended up working in town for about six years after college first as assistant manager then store manager of two Rural King stores. I began to look for a job in agriculture, and I finally decided to come back to the family farm in 2009. Leaving the farm was probably the best thing I did. It made me realize farming is what I'm supposed to be doing. It provides a great work/life balance for us, and I look forward to going to work every day.

2.       How do you spend a typical day?

Right now we are in the middle of the growing season so for us the field work with equipment in the field is done until harvest. There are still many jobs to do, though. The past week I've been spending a good deal of time looking at soybean fields to see if they are ready for their first post emerge spraying. We hire out all our spraying so it takes some coordination and communication to get things done how we want. I've also been collecting corn tissue samples to send to a lab to find out if we are limited by any particular nutrient. I should have the results any day now. When they arrive we will assess them and see what action, if any, needs to be taken to push our yields.

Off the farm, my day starts by dropping off our two boys at either one of their grandma's houses. Depending on the day, the little one may go to day care and the oldest will go to one grandma or another. My wife works in two counties, so there are days she takes the boys depending on where she is working that day. When we all get home we will probably drive over to our new house that is being built right now to check on the day's progress. It's exciting! Then we'll relax at home while the boys play until they go to bed.

 

 

Brian is handing down his farming expertise to the next generation of farmers, his son. (Video Credit: Brian Scott)

3.       How do biotechnology and GMOs impact your farm?

Biotech is key right now as we are getting different fields sprayed to control weeds. Half our field corn plus our popcorn is non-GMO so we have to be sure to communicate that to the applicator. Not so much for spraying the wrong herbicide, but so they’ll know whatever sprayer comes to those fields has to be rinsed clean of glyphosate (Roundup) before our fields are sprayed. We are growing some Xtend beans this year which means they have a biotech trait for dicamba tolerance in addition to glyphosate tolerance. The additional trait expands our weed control toolbox for soybeans. That box is already somewhat limited during the growing season as compared to corn. There are great herbicide options even in non-GMO corn that can be sprayed in crop. Soybeans are somewhat limited after emergence. We may or may not use the two dicamba formulations on the market for these beans depending on the types of weeds we find in those fields. Glyphosate on its own may work just fine. But if we find marestail and waterhemp in the Xtend fields we’ll go ahead with spraying Xtendimax or Engenia to handle them. Liberty Link is another option in corn and soybeans that brings tolerance to another type of herbicide. And soon Enlist soybeans should hit the market which will allow for spraying of 2,4-D in beans, so the toolbox is expanding which is good. More options means more ways for farmers to control tough weeds. Rotating types of herbicide is an important part of stewarding biotech so that we don't rely on a single herbicide. Doing so puts great selection pressure on weeds, and eventually resistance in the weed population will arise. Herbicide isn't our only tool for weed control, but it's nice to see the options on the rise.

 

Gmo, farm, biotechnology, agriculture, harvest, xtend soybeans, gmo soybean

Xtend soybeans are herbicide-tolerant which helps farmers control weeds and protect their crops.  (Image Credit: Brian Scott)

 

4.       What’s something you wish everyone knew about your job?

I want everyone to know that we try to be better farmers every season. We try something new or different every year and test the results against our normal practices to see which works better. We set up trials for fertilizer and seeding rates to see what the upper and lower limits are where yield or cost of production begins to suffer. We've been pushing further with cover crops by letting them grow longer in the spring than we have in the past. It can get a little dicey with a wet spring like we had this year, but we are learning more about how to manage covers each season.

 

Gmo, farm, biotechnology, agriculture, harvest, cover crops

Cover crops help protect and enrich the soil. (Image Credit: Brian Scott)

5.       How does your farm benefit your local community?

Although the farm is the family business we really have a team within our community that works with us to be successful. I already mentioned the custom spraying we have done. All our dry fertilizer is custom applied as well. Our chemical and fertilizer dealers, of course, get paid to cover our acres, and they employ local people to do these jobs. Our business reaches further into the community through our bank, our seed dealers, the grain elevators we haul to, our crop insurance agent, and so on. We just recently were a stop on the Purdue Farm Management Tour, which allowed area farmers and ag business people to visit our farm and learn why we do things the way we do.

Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on July 21, 2017
To feed the world, we need to reduce food waste, while increasing the yield of food in a sustainable way on land already dedicated to agriculture—and GMOs can help! Genetically modified (GM) foods provide a nutritional and safe alternate to conventionally produced foods. However, the GM food (or GMO) may have an undesired characteristic removed from it (example: for longer shelf life, such as Artic Apples, which do no brown after slicing) OR a characteristic can be introduced to aid in... Read More
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Video: Let’s Talk About GMOs And The Environment

GMOs are one of the best tools farmers have to help protect and preserve our natural resources. Learn how they help us address some of today’s most pressing environmental challenges.

By • June 29, 2017

This post was originally published on GMO Answers' Medium page.

GMOs and biotechnology and have had a positive impact on the sustainability of agriculture in the last 20 years, according to a new study recently released by PG Economics. GMO Answers took a closer look and highlighted the 5 Things to Know about GMOs based on its results. To dig deeper, we asked GMO Answers volunteer expert and agriculture researcher, Esther Ngumbi to provide her perspective on some of the data presented in another report that was recently released by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA).

 

Ngumbi is part of research in agricultural technology that can help mitigate environmental challenges and ensure food security around the world. (Image Credit: Auburn University/Jeff Etheridge)

 

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the world population is expected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050. This presents an enormous challenge and necessitates the need to find sustainable ways to grow food to feed this expanding population.

Just like the challenge is enormous, the solutions and approaches we employ to tackle this challenge and achieve food security must be broad. We must use a wide range of tools and technologies and draw from several approaches including climate smart agriculture practices and the use of biotech crops. At the same time, these tools must be sensitive to our environment.

Indeed, biotech crops grown in over 26 countries have contributed to helping feed the current population and are expected to continue to be part of the solutions humanity can use to help tackle the challenge of feeding an expanding population. According to the global status of commercialized Biotech/GM crops 2016 report, in a period spanning over 20 years, 2 billion hectares of biotech crops have been commercially grown. These crops range from maize to soybeans to cowpeas to potatoes.

But there is more to the planting of biotech crops. The benefits are numerous and include increase in crop yields, which in turn leads to the attainment of food security, conservation of biodiversity, improvement of soil health, reduction in costs associated with agricultural inputs needed to grow crops, reductions in the use of water needed to grow crops and the enhancement of plants’ ability to cope with climate change.

Most importantly is that biotech crops can help farmers mitigate the harsh consequences and monetary losses that come with a changing climate. As a result of climate change, droughts, floods and many other weather related disasters have become frequent affecting food production in both in the developed countries and developing countries. These disasters are also accompanied with losses exceeding $1 billion. For example, in 2016, in the United States, agricultural losses as a result of droughts exceeded $5.2 billion dollars.

To deal with the drought, farmers in the United States and around the world, including South Africa, have employed a broad array of tools, including the planting of biotech crops such as maize. This biotech maize is modified to tolerate drought. The successes arising from planting crops that have been modified to withstand the harsh consequences of climate change have in turn led to the appreciation of biotech crops and an increase in the total acreage of planted crops.

Unfortunately, apart from South Africa, Burkina Faso, Sudan and a few other African countries, the appreciation for biotech crops and the potential they have to help Africa attain food security, while helping the continent deal with climate-change related disasters such as drought, is yet to be achieved.

Of course, it is easy to understand. The use of biotech crops remains a controversial topic and there are many myths that have been floated around with regards to how unsafe biotech crops are both to humans and to our environment. In addition, many African countries are yet to put in place biosafety and regulatory controls that are needed to ensure all protocols are followed. However, many of these myths are yet to be proven true by science.

Yet, over and over, science continues to prove that biotech crops, once planted, deliver many benefits including improving crop yields and helping crops withstand the consequences of a changing climate. At the same time, the benefits of biotech crops can mean a lot especially to the over 500 million smallholder farmers. These farmers farm on degraded and unproductive soils and are dependent on increasingly erratic rainfall patterns. When crops do grow, they are affected by diseases, pests, and drought. Too often, farmers lack access to critical agricultural inputs like fertilizers that can enhance crop yields.

Benefits brought about by planting biotech crops, including increasing crop yields, would mean that resource poor farmers reap the benefits that come about with planting biotech crops. In South Africa, for example, biotech crops enhanced farm income by $156 million. And in Burkina Faso, smallholder farmers that planted biotech cotton increased yields by 20 percent with resultant profit increases of $64 per hectare.

What is encouraging is that around the world, the number of acreage of biotech crops has been increasing. In 2016, for example, global acreage of these crops increased from 179.7 million hectares to 185.1 million hectares. Perhaps, most striking statistic is that of the 26 countries planting biotech crops, 19 were developing countries.

This increasing demand should encourage the countries that are still considering adopting biotech crops.

There is no one perfect solution to solving our global challenges. Therefore, governments, farmers, scientists, non-governmental organizations and all stakeholders in the space of developing sustainable solutions to agriculture should be open minded and accommodative to using the many tools that are available including the use of biotech crops. At the end, it will take a broad array of solutions to eradicate hunger, feed our rapidly expanding population, and tackle the many challenges that come with a changing climate and biotech crops have proven that they can be part of the solution. 

Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on July 21, 2017
To feed the world, we need to reduce food waste, while increasing the yield of food in a sustainable way on land already dedicated to agriculture—and GMOs can help! Genetically modified (GM) foods provide a nutritional and safe alternate to conventionally produced foods. However, the GM food (or GMO) may have an undesired characteristic removed from it (example: for longer shelf life, such as Artic Apples, which do no brown after slicing) OR a characteristic can be introduced to aid in... Read More

QCan you post this Perry et al article in your Info Resources section Science Advances 31 Aug 2016 Vol. 2, no. 8, e1600850 DOI 10.1126sciadv.1600850

Can you post this Perry et al article in your Info Resources section Science Advances 31 Aug 2016 Vol. 2, no. 8, e1600850 DOI 10.1126sciadv.1600850
Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on May 5, 2016
Thank you for your question regarding the benefits of GMOs. Our experts have answered similar questions in the past – please see below for a comprehensive overview on this topic which should help address your question.   WHAT IS A GMO?   When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and... Read More

By • June 14, 2017

This post was originally published on GMO Answers' Medium page.

Recognizing Two Decades of Biotechnology in Agriculture: Measuring the Economic and Environmental Benefits of GM Crops

gmo crops, gmo environment, gmo agriculture

 

Since 1974, the United Nations has hosted World Environment Day annually on June 5 — the organization’s most important day to inspire action and awareness for the protection of our environment. Since its inception, World Environment Day has grown to a global platform for public outreach that is celebrated widely in over 100 countries around the world. Each World Environment Day is organized around a theme that focuses attention on a particularly pressing environmental concern. The theme for 2017 is connecting people to nature.

As we think about this year’s theme, what closer connection do we have to nature than the food we eat?

Today, a new report was released that outlines the dramatic economic and environmental benefits of biotechnology in agriculture over the past 20 years. The 2017 PG Economics study found that crop biotechnology has significantly reduced agriculture’s environmental impact and contributed to preserving the earth’s natural resources, while boosting the global economy by allowing farmers to grow more, high-quality crops. GMO Answers took a closer look at the study, and found five key takeaways on how GMOs benefit our environment and the economy:

1. Reduce Agriculture’s Environmental Impact

According to the report, GM crops have helped farmers adopt more sustainable practices that have significantly reduced agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions. These practices include reduced tillage, a farming practice that decreases the burning of fossil fuels to retain more carbon in the soil. The report concludes that without biotech crops in 2015, an additional 26.7 billion kg (58.9 billion lbs) of carbon dioxide would have entered the atmosphere — the equivalence of adding more than 11.9 million cars to the road!

2. Help Conserve Land & Contribute To Global Food Security

Biotech crops allow farmers to grow more without using additional land. The report found that in 2015, farmers would have needed to plant an additional 8.4 million hectares (20.8 million acres) of soybeans, 7.4 million hectares (18.3 million acres) of corn, 3 million hectares (7.4 million acres) of cotton, and 0.7 million hectares (1.7 million acres) of canola without the use of crop biotechnology — totaling the equivalent of needing 11 percent of the arable land in the United States.

3. Enable Farmers To Increase Crop Yields Insect resistant (IR) and herbicide tolerant (HT) technologies have allowed farmers to deliver higher crop yields. IR soybeans grown commercially in South

America since 2013 are providing farmers with an average 9.6 percent yield improvement through reduced pest damage. In Argentina, farmers are utilizing HT technology to improve weed control, allowing them to grow and reap benefits from an additional soybean crop after wheat in the same growing season.

4. Support Improved Livelihoods

Especially in developing countries, crop biotechnology helps farmers provide better lives for themselves and their families by earning higher incomes with increased crop yields. The study reported that in 2015, the net farm level economic benefit was $15.5 billion, or an increased income of about $90/hectare ($36/acre), and from 1996 to 2015, global farm incomes increased $167.7 billion.

5. Contribute To Global Economic Success

For over two decades, crop biotechnology continues to be a good investment for millions of farmers around the world. In 2015, farmers paid $6.3 billion to leverage crop biotechnology, a number equal to 29 percent of the total gains of $21.8 billion. Globally, for each extra dollar invested in biotech crop seeds, farmers earned an average extra $3.45. This technology is particularly important in developing countries, where farmers received $5.15 for each extra dollar invested in biotech crop seeds. This study is further proof that biotechnology will continue to be a valuable asset not only to the farming community, but the global environment and economy. Have questions about the study or GMOs? Visit GMOAnswers.com to learn more.

Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on May 5, 2016
Thank you for your question regarding the benefits of GMOs. Our experts have answered similar questions in the past – please see below for a comprehensive overview on this topic which should help address your question.   WHAT IS A GMO?   When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and... Read More

There is a lot of misinformation surrounding GMOs.  From GMOs producing extra-large fruits to GMOs causing allergies, we dispel some of the common GMO myths with science-based facts. 

Infographics & Downloadables

INFOGRAPHIC: The History of Genetic Modification in Crops

INFOGRAPHIC: Are GMOs Safe?

HANDOUT: GMO Answers Informational Guide

PRESENTATION: Get to Know GMOs

HANDOUT: Get to Know the Health & Safety of GMOs

HANDOUT: Get To Know GMOs

HANDOUT: Top Ten Consumer Questions Answered

More Information for GMO Myths vs. Facts

If Himalayan pink salt doesn't have genes, how can it be a GMO? It can't.

GMO Myths vs. Facts

There are many myths and misconceptions about GMOs. Let’s take a look at a few of the most common myths and learn about the facts: MYTH:There are dozens of GMO crops, including strawberries, bananas and wheat.There is even GMO water and GMO salt. FACT:There are nine genetically modified crops commercially available today: sweet and field corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, potatoes, and squash. GM apples have been approved and will be commercially available soon. This chartexplains why each of the nine GMO crops are genetically modified. The majority of these crops, like alfalfa, field corn and soy are actually used...
Read More

GMOs and Livestock

In the United States, livestock have been consuming feed made from genetically modified crops for almost twenty years.More than two-thirds of GM corn and half of GM soybeans are used for livestock feed. In that time,GMOs have never been detected in the milk, meat or eggs derived from animals fed genetically modified feed. Meaning livestock process GMO feed in the same way as any other feed. Many studies have been conducted on the potential for GMO DNA or proteins to be transferred into animal tissues.No intact or immunologically reactive protein or DNA has been detected in animal tissue. Alison Van Eenennaam, Animal Genomics and Biotechnology Cooperative...
Read More

GMOs in the Grocery Store

GMO Crops Contrary to misconceptions, only a few GMO crops in the grocery store are available as whole produce – sweet corn, summer squash, papayas and potatoes. But large sections of the produce aisle are not comprised of GMOs. Seedless watermelons, for instance, are not GMOs. Other food products, however, may contain ingredients derived from GMO crops. Ingredients derived from genetically modified corn, soy, sugar beets and canola are used in a wide variety of foods including cereal, corn chips, veggie burgers and more. However, it is important to remember that genetically modified crops are nutritionally equivalent to non-genetically modified foods,...
Read More

Where GMOs Are Grown

Think only U.S. farmers grow GMO crops? You might be surprised to know that while each country has its own regulatory process for both the cultivation and sale of GM products, as of 2016, GMOs are grown, imported and/or used in more than 75 countries across the globe. As of 2015, 2.0 billion cumulative hectares of biotech crops have been planted since 1996. This includes a wide [no-lexicon]variety[/no-lexicon] of crops and countries, including maize in Spain, Bt cotton in Sudan, eggplant in Bangladesh, soybeans in Bolivia and more. The top five countries planting biotech crops by hectarage are the U.S., Brazil, Argentina, India and Canada. A single GM...
Read More

Current GMO Crops

The nine genetically modified crops available today: sweet and field corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, potatoes, and squash. GM apples have been approved and will be commercially available in Fall 2017. Below is a list outlining the year in which the nine crops that are currently commercially available were launched: Squash, 1995 Cotton, 1996 Soybean, 1995 Corn, 1996 Papaya, 1997 Alfalfa, 2006 Sugar beets, 2006 Canola, 1999 Potato, 2016 Apples, to be released in Fall 2017 The list below identifies the genetic traits expressed and uses of the 10 GMO crops approved in the U.S. These 10 crops are the only GMOs that are approved in the U...
Read More

How GMOs Are Made

Farmers have selectively cultivated plants for thousands of years, choosing a plant, for example, based on its ability to survive certain conditions or on how many seeds it produces.Farmers also sought to improve plants by crossing them with related species that had other desirable characteristics. This type of selective, or traditional, breeding involves crossing thousands of genes. Genetically modified organisms are the product of a targeted process where a few select genes are transferred into a plant to produce a desired trait. When scientists create a genetically modified plant, the process begins by identifying a desired trait.That trait may be...
Read More

GMO Basics

What are GMOs? Are GMOs safe? Why do farmers grow GMO crops? We know there are a lot of questions regarding GMOs, Genetically Modified Organisms. Let’s start with the basics. What Are GMOs? When people refer to genetically modified organisms - GMOs - they are referring to crops developed through genetic engineering, a more precise method of plant breeding. Genetic engineering, also referred to as biotechnology, allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait found in nature and transfer it from one plant or organism to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing. Some examples of...
Read More

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By • June 08, 2017

The following is an excerpt of an opinion piece by Mara Abbott in the Daily Camera (Boulder, Co.), one of five in her series on farming in Boulder. 

A human-rights activist, an environmental consultant, and a host of biodynamic, organic and GMO farmers all walked into interviews with me to talk about their dreams for Boulder County's croplands.

The punchline? Everyone I interviewed wants the same thing — sustainable agriculture on open space land. For some, that sustainability is an ideology. For others, it is a livelihood. But the priority is unanimous. They also all believe in open space exceptionalism — our soil that grows the world's best sugar beets and high-country barley, our land that will host ground-breaking research on carbon sequestration, or commissioner Elise Jones' simple rationale that, "Boulder County is always a model, both within the state and beyond. This piece is no different."

Over the past two weeks, I've outlined environmental, economic and even social reasons why the rushed GMO ban on Boulder County agricultural lands doesn't make much sense — particularly considering recent setbacks further delaying research intended to facilitate the transition.

So let's try something: Let's pretend that it was the farmers — men and women who embody generations of experience working this land — who were in charge rather than the commissioners, two-thirds of whom seem bound either by politics or ideology to a short-sighted plan of action.

What steps would the farmers advise? What do they believe could be done to advance a future for the open space agricultural lands full of sustainability, resilience and good, healthy, local food?

Visit the Daily Camera website to read the full article. 

Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on December 20, 2016
The only alternative is that livestock be fed feed that does not contain any GMOs. This is misleading, however, because all feedstuffs over history have evolved by classical plant breeding and genetic selection, which involved genetic modification! Thus, we have the outcomes of plant breeding (crossbreeding) and those obtained by the use of contemporary genetic enhancement (the GMO's) using powerful, precise, and advanced scientific methodologies. Read More

By • June 05, 2017

Can GMOs help protect the environment? Contrary to myths about GMOs hurting the environment, GMOs allow farmers to preserve the land while doing more with less resources. Check out this infographic and learn how GMOs help protect the environment. 

gmo, gmo environment, gmo population, gmo food, gmo fiber, gmo fuel, gmo farmer, gmo preserve

 

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Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on May 5, 2016
Thank you for your question regarding the benefits of GMOs. Our experts have answered similar questions in the past – please see below for a comprehensive overview on this topic which should help address your question.   WHAT IS A GMO?   When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and... Read More

By • June 05, 2017

In the United States, approximately 133 billion pounds of food is wasted annually. GMOs help farmers minimize these losses and grow more food using less land.

gmo, gmo food waste, gmo environment, gmo apple, gm apple, gmo waste
 
 

 

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Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on December 1, 2016
Viroids are very small pieces of circular RNA that have the potential of causing plant diseases. These entities are infectious agents that are different from viruses because they have no protein coat encircling their genetic material. Thus far, viroids are only known to be effective infectious agents in plants. Viroids have not been associated with any animal disease, and they have not been found in animal cells and tissues.    Biotechnological tools are being used in... Read More
Posted on May 5, 2016
Thank you for your question regarding the benefits of GMOs. Our experts have answered similar questions in the past – please see below for a comprehensive overview on this topic which should help address your question.   WHAT IS A GMO?   When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and... Read More

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