Business Practices

QIs it imaginable that with the growth of the science and the smaller restrictions on CRISPR, that well finally see some small local or regional GMO companies?I actually understand the point made by a lot of environmentalists regarding the fact that GMOs a

Is it imaginable that with the growth of the science and the smaller restrictions on CRISPR, that well finally see some small local or regional GMO companies? I actually understand the point made by a lot of environmentalists regarding the fact that GMOs are often profit-oriented, and controlled by a few (I imagine less than 10) big companies, but that's mostly because of the price of R&D, which is high mostly because of the irrational fear regarding GMOs that most people feel.

The top organizations that benefit from GMOs are the producer organizations and ultimately the farmers themselves. When famers grow any crop, regardless of whether it is GM or not, they pay a small fee, known as a ‘check-off’ that goes to fund

The top organizations that benefit from GMOs are the producer organizations and ultimately the farmers themselves. When famers grow any crop, regardless of whether it is GM or not, they pay a small fee, known as a ‘check-off’ that goes to fund further research into the development of new crop varieties. Each commodity has a check-off fee specific to that commodity and the check-off fees are not necessarily the same for each commodity.

QIs glyphosate (a broad spectrum herbicide manufactured by Monsanto) removed from GMO-glyphosate tolerant crops of horse hay (alfalfa, timothy, bermuda, etc.), and straw before it is baled and bulk shipped to California race tracks and feed stores?

Is glyphosate (a broad spectrum herbicide manufactured by Monsanto) removed from GMO-glyphosate tolerant crops of horse hay (alfalfa, timothy, bermuda, etc.), and straw before it is baled and bulk shipped to California race tracks and feed stores?

AExpert Answer

When glyphosate is applied to plants (e.g., crops or weeds) a certain percentage is absorbed and transported throughout the plant. The amount absorbed is variable depending on the application rate and the type of plant. Very little of the absorbed glyphosate is degraded by the plant and cannot be removed. Its persistence in plants is also variable. Federal regulatory agencies have established allowable limits for glyphosate residues in many different crops to protect human and animal health.  The tolerance for glyphosate in grass, forage, fodder and hay, and non-grass animal feed is either 300 ppm (e.g., timothy or Bermuda) or 400 ppm (e.g., alfalfa). Concentrations below these tolerances would be considered safe to feed to livestock such as cattle and horses; concentrations above these tolerances would be considered adulterated and should not be fed to livestock. It is important to point out that allowable concentrations have wide margins of safety built in to their determination. 

QHow do you remain unbiased when your funding comes from companies directly involved with the production of GMO products?

How do you remain unbiased when your funding comes from companies directly involved with the production of GMO products?

AExpert Answer

GMO Answers provides the facts that answer questions related to biotechnology, GM crops and agriculture. We work to ensure that the content and answers provided by experts and companies are accurate and therefore do not present opinions about GMOs, simply facts. GMO Answers is a community focused on constructive discussion about GMOs in order to have open conversations about agriculture and GMOs.

This website is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information. The Council for Biotechnology Information is comprised of five different companies, who are committed to the responsible development and application of plant biotechnology. These companies include: BASF, Bayer, Corteva Agriscience (TM); Agriculture Division of DowDuPont(TM), Monsanto Company and Syngenta.

GMO Answers expert and Consultant, Savage & Associates, Steve Savage, provides background on public/private partnerships in this article, originally posted on Forbes. He addresses why land grant universities work with private sector to bring new innovations to the market. A snippet is included below.

“The implication is that any connection, particularly any financial connection, between academics and for-profit businesses is inappropriate.  Not only are the tactics of this effort reprehensible, the entire premise is wrong…

There is a network of “Land Grant” colleges and Universities throughout the US that was first set up in the late 1800s through the Morrill Acts. Their purpose was to focus on agriculture, science, military science and engineering. They became important centers of applied research which has been of great benefit for the global food supply. These institutions have traditionally been part of a synergistic, public/private partnership for the discovery, testing and commercialization of innovations of value to the farming community. They also educate future farmers, the specialized scientists and engineers who become the employees of ag-related businesses, and the future faculty.”

 Read the full article here.

We hope this answers your question, if you have any other questions about GMOs or biotechnology, please ask.

 

QWill gmos save the world?

Will gmos save the world?

AExpert Answer

GMOs will not “save the world,” however they are an important tool in the toolbox for food security and agriculture.

Dr. Stuart Smyth, Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioresource Policy, Business and Economics at the University of Saskatchewan, explores this topic in depth in a similar question and response here.

“No single crop or food production method is capable of feeding the world on its own, so no, GMOs by themselves will not feed the world. However, as part of a global strategy to improve global food security, GMOs can have a tremendously positive contribution to feeding the world…. Innovative technologies in plant breeding and crop production in all forms of food production are essential to ensuring that an integrated approach to improving food security is implemented. GM crops, can and will, be able to contribute to improving food security in some regions.”

Read the full response.

Tamika Sims, PhD, Director of Food Technology Communications at IFIC explains that To feed the world, we need to reduce food waste, while increasing the yield of food in a sustainable way on land already dedicated to agriculture—and GMOs can help! Genetically modified (GM) foods provide a nutritional and safe alternate to conventionally produced foods.” Read her full response here.

We also invite you to check out the response to, “do you think that GMOs are the answer to fuel our ever growing population?

QHow are GMO's made, machines? labs?

How are GMO's made, machines? labs?

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