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Assuming this question relates to the percentage of global GMO production – the USA accounted for 35 percent of the global area planted to GM soy in 2015 (35 percent in 2014 and 34 percent in 2013). The USA accounted for 59 percent of the global planting of GM corn in 2015 (58 percent in 2014, 59 percent in 2013).   Sources: ISAAA, USDA NASS, various national Ministries of Agriculture

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Food production is affected by numerous factors, such as the amount of rain the crop receives, the quality of the soil, the number of weeds that compete for soil nutrients and moisture and the number of insects that feed on the crop. GMOs can’t address all of these factors, but they can address two important ones: weeds and insects. ...

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No single crop or food production method is capable of feeding the world on its own, so no, GMOs by themselves will not feed the world. However, as part of a global strategy to improve global food security, GMOs can have a tremendously positive contribution to feeding the world. ...

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In all cases, users of a pesticide should refer to the affixed product label prior to use. This label should contain advice about planting restrictions. If this label isn’t available or questions remain, the user should contact the manufacturer of the product to obtain information about the proper application, restrictions and safety of the specific product prior to its use.

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On average, GMOs take 13 years and $130 million of research and development before coming to market. We’ve created the below infographic that outlines this process in more detail. ...

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Although this seems like a very straight forward question, there are different answers depending on which jurisdiction one ifis talking about and what one’s definition of GMO is. For the purpose of this answer we will define GMO as any organism that has had its DNA altered using genetic engineering (GE). ...

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This is always a challenging question to answer. The price difference between GMO and non-GMO varies from product to product and from one location to the next. The answer depends on what type of non-GMO product is being purchased. Most GMOs consumed are in the form of processed foods, it’s estimated that as much as 80 percent of processed foods include a GM ingredient. Let’s think of food prices like car prices. An automotive company offers a plain-Jane car at the lowest price, if...

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The gene gun was invented between 1983 and 1986 by researchers at Cornell University and DuPont. Originally, it was used to fire particles, coated with DNA, into plant cells. As pictured in the diagram, the particles are coated and placed on a plastic disc, which is fired out of the gene gun at rapid speed. The disc is stopped by a screen, allowing only the DNA-coated particles to travel through and into cells contained on a plate below.  ...

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Food manufacturers are working to meet a growing demand by consumers interested in additional information about food products and the process through which plant-based ingredients are grown. This includes providing information about whether or not food ingredients were derived from genetically engineered plants. Food manufacturers certify and label some products as non-GMO to provide product options for consumers that wish to avoid genetically engineered food. It is important to point out,...

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After a long research process, only a few crop varieties reach the market and become commercial. Whether those crops are GMO and or non-GMO, it is valid to say that only varieties that have the best combination of genes make it to market. ...

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