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In addition to the below response, in this recent response from Chris Barbey, PhD Student, Plant Molecular Genetics and [no-lexicon]Cell[/no-lexicon] Biology at the University of Florida, he addresses the non-browning apples in more detail.

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I don't see organic foods becoming obsolete in the future, but I could see what qualifies as certified organic changing over time. There is some debate right now about whether or not the meaning of organic is being diluted. For example, look at growing produce hydroponically. There are some who do not want hydroponics to fall under the organic label. They believe organic should be about taking care of the soil as much if not more than growing the crop, and when there's no soil...

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The technology of genetic modification or genetic engineering was first developed in the early 1970s, commercialized in pharmaceutical applications in the early 1980s, and then agricultural applications in the early 1990s. You can read more about genetic modification for medical purposes in the article GMOs in Food and Medicine: An Overview  by Richard Green, Former Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Manager. Read more about why GMOs were first created and for what...

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Plant breeding technologies have systematically increased variation in major food crops by using a [no-lexicon] variety [/no-lexicon] of scientific tools, such as crossing, mutation, genetics and statistics. Take corn, the most produced grain in the world, as an example. Numerous varieties of field corn, sweet corn and popcorn have been developed through plant breeding technologies. From hundreds of varieties, farmers choose the best ones suited for their soils, climates and cultivation...

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Genetically modified food refers to edible matters that are genetically modified, or contain components from a genetically modified organism (GMO). Genetically modified organisms can be a crop plant or a microorganism. It is relatively easy to genetically modify microorganisms. For example, genetically modified microbes are used to produce enzymes used for making cheese and other dairy products. On the other hand, genetic modification of crop plants such as corn and soybeans is much more...

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For more information on plant breeding techniques we invite you to check out the below similar questions that have been answered before. ...

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Quite simply, genetically modified crops have given us farmers the ability to do more with less. On our farm we have seen a decrease in use of fuel because we are not in our fields as much; our pesticide use has decreased. We have been able to incorporate cover crops, no-till and other conservation methods more freely because we've been able to control weed, pest and disease pressure better with genetically modified seed. ...

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Dr. Larry Gilbertson, PhD, Genomics Strategy Lead at Monsanto, explains how GMOs are “created” or made exactly, answering a lot of common questions about this process in this post. Watch as he prepares to create a GMO here. ...

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That’s actually a pretty difficult question to really pin down. As you say, this was asked in 2015, but we set out to find out if that number had changed at all.  ...

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Every fruit, vegetable & grain that is available today has been altered genetically through human intervention and selective breeding. Read more about how this is done here.  ...

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