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Every fruit, vegetable & grain that is available today has been altered genetically through human intervention and selective breeding. Read more about how this is done here.  ...

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To feed the world, we need to reduce food waste, while increasing the yield of food in a sustainable way on land already dedicated to agriculture—and GMOs can help! Genetically modified (GM) foods provide a nutritional and safe alternate to conventionally produced foods. However, the GM food (or GMO) may have an undesired characteristic removed from it (example: for longer shelf life, such as Artic Apples, which do no brown after slicing) OR a characteristic can be introduced to aid in...

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A “bioactive peptide” refers to relatively short chain of amino acids (peptide) that has a biological effect in people or animals. Bioactive peptides are made up of amino acids linked chemically in a specific sequence; it is the specific order or sequence of the amino acids that gives the peptide its unique activity. Proteins are generally regarded as being longer sequences of amino acids (usually more than 200 amino acid long sequences.) However, there is no general rule as to...

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There are a variety of ways in which GMOs help low- and middle-income countries address issues surrounding food security. In this response, Cecilia Chi-Ham, Director of Science & Technology at PIPRA, addresses this topic. ...

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On the assumption that this question is asking if GMO crops keep food affordable, the answer is yes, they do contribute to keeping food affordable. This arises from the cost reducing and yield enhancing impacts of using GM technology in crops like corn, soybeans, cotton and canola over the last 20 years. As a result of yield gains, between 1996 and 2013, crop biotechnology has been responsible for additional global production of 138 million tonnes of soybeans and 274 million tonnes of...

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Crops improved through the means of biotechnology save land in two ways. One is termed “land sparing” meaning that if farmers can produce more output per planted acre, then there is reduced pressure to add more farmed land in order to keep up with growing global demand. The second way that biotech crops “save land” is more literal. Particularly when farmland is tilled (plowed) for weed control, it is very susceptible to erosion by water or wind.  Topsoil...

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The technology of genetic modification or genetic engineering was first developed in the early 1970s, commercialized in pharmaceutical applications in the early 1980s, and then agricultural applications in the early 1990s. You can read more about genetic modification for medical purposes in the article GMOs in Food and Medicine: An Overview  by Richard Green, Former Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Manager. ...

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I believe you are referring to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, and you are correct that he did once work as an attorney for The Monsanto Chemical Company from 1976-1979. At that time, Monsanto was not involved in biotechnology and seed production. ...

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Thank you for the question. Roundup Ready® crops (a brand name for some glyphosate-tolerant crops) have been enhanced through biotechnology to no longer be susceptible to glyphosate. Corn, soybean, cotton, canola, sugar beet and alfalfa are all examples of crops that have some glyphosate-tolerant varieties. Farmers use herbicides as one method to control weeds on their farms.  ...

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