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Thanks for your question. We recommend the educational booklet publication “Dai geni ai semi,” written by Giorgio Morelli from INRAN, for background information on GMOs and agriculture. You may also find interesting the Italian journal articles listed below, a particular article I would like to highlight is written by one of Italy’s most prominent oncologists, Veronesi: ‘Cari nemici degli Ogm vi prego ripensateci quei semi migliorano la vita dell’uomo”....

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There are no modern GM sweet potatoes approved for sale in the U.S., Spain or Sweden. ...

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While nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding, there are only nine commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya and potatoes. GMO apples have also been approved to be grown and will be coming to market soon. ...

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GMOs in agriculture have made positive environmental and socio-economic contributions around the world. There are many “pros” of GMOs for farmers, the environment and consumers. Here are some GMO traits and examples of how they help farmers, consumers, the environment and economy: ...

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We would like to answer your question in two parts. First, where you can buy GMO food, and secondly, where you can buy GMO seeds. ...

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On average, GMOs take 13 years and $130 million of research and development before coming to market. We’ve created the below infographic that outlines this process in more detail. ...

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There is very little research into the impacts of the introduction of GMO’s on jobs. For the U.S., I am aware of just two studies that address this question directly. In a study on herbicide tolerant corn, cotton and soybeans for 2001-2003, researchers found a significant reduction in household labor associated with adoption of herbicide tolerant soybeans, but no difference for corn or cotton (Gardner, et al., 2009). Another study, using data from 1996-2001, found that adoption of...

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Although this seems like a very straight forward question, there are different answers depending on which jurisdiction one ifis talking about and what one’s definition of GMO is. For the purpose of this answer we will define GMO as any organism that has had its DNA altered using genetic engineering (GE). ...

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This is always a challenging question to answer. The price difference between GMO and non-GMO varies from product to product and from one location to the next. The answer depends on what type of non-GMO product is being purchased. Most GMOs consumed are in the form of processed foods, it’s estimated that as much as 80 percent of processed foods include a GM ingredient. Let’s think of food prices like car prices. An automotive company offers a plain-Jane car at the lowest price, if...

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The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Statistics Division (FAOSTAT) and the United States Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA FAS) are two comprehensive databases that track the import and export of commodities around the world. The U.S. is a very large exporter of agricultural commodities, but also a large importer of key commodities from a very large number of countries. The U.S. imports several GM crops, including canola from Canada; and...

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