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A GMO plant can be made to produce different chemicals. At the initial level the products of added genes are proteins, but proteins can also function as enzymes i.e., they cause chemical reactions and these chemicals can affect growth. ...

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Yes, but only on purpose. Folks may have seen ornamental plants that have red or purple foliage. It is possible to copy this natural phenomenon into other plants using GMO technology. Other than that, the simple act of making a plant a GMO should not change its color.  

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In addition to the below, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) regulates the use and release of plant pathogens, either genetically engineered or not. The Biotechnology Regulatory Services (BRS), which is within APHIS, has recently replied to a request for guidance on the use of naturally occurring isolate of Agrobacterium rhizogenes  - to induce a reduction in height in ornamental kalanchoe plants. You can find the BRS response regarding the regulatory...

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Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and...

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When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing. You may have also heard of agricultural biotechnology or biotech seeds....

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Sun Pacific oranges are not a GM food, in fact all oranges are not a GM crop. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. But there are only 10 commercially available GM crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. ...

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That’s a great question because so many people ‘expect’ there to be a difference and taste is purely a subjective assessment. So the answer is – it depends. ...

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GMOs are considered an important tool in addressing complex issues around the globe. From environmental sustainability to nutritional benefits, we’ve outlined many of the important ways GMOs can provided benefits to farmers, consumers and the environment in this response. ...

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We would like to address your question in two parts. We will explain exactly what a GMO is and then explain what foods are “turned into GMOs” - otherwise known as what crops are genetically modified. ...

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The obvious answer to whether there are positives in not using genetic engineering is the reduced regulatory process. It can take tens of millions of dollars to bring a genetically engineered product to market, something that is not feasible for academics or small businesses. The result is a product needs to be able to make quite a bit of money to be worth the years of effort for approval. This generally means that only the crops with millions of acres are worthwhile. ...

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