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I’m a Monsanto scientist who has more than 20 years of experience with genetic modification of plants. I will try to answer your question, even though I don’t ever do experiments on animals, certainly not on humans, of course! ...

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The origins of this question go back 20 years. In 1998, the European Union announced it would put a moratorium on the importing of GM crops starting in June 1999, arguing that risk assessments had either not been done correctly or not done to a sufficient scope as to determine the safety of GM crops. Risk assessments are a science-based process that have been standardized and globally accepted, so this argument was not supported by scientific evidence. Argentina, Canada and the USA were the...

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There are many reasons people are afraid or wary of GMOs. In 2015, The Washington Post, published an article on why people are scared of GMOs. The article explores how this mindset began, consumer sentiment around GMOs and what exactly people are scared of. ...

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There are currently no tomatoes that are GMO on the market or commercially available. For more information about the common misinformation around GM tomatoes, please check out this previous response.  ...

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Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. However, there are only 10 commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. Below is a table outlining what year the 10 crops became commercially available in the U.S.: ...

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Genetic engineering has become an integrated component of modern agriculture, especially in the United States. Soybeans, for instance, are over 90 percent genetically engineered (GE) in U.S. fields. It’s important to acknowledge that this adoption rate is a result of farmers choosing to plant these types of crops themselves. Part of the reason that they choose to do so is because it makes their jobs easier. The most common types of GE crops make the plants resistant to insects or...

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Many people have commented on this, offering a [no-lexicon]variety[/no-lexicon] to reasons for the opposition to GMOs and GM crops. They offer examples such as the detection of BSE in British cattle and the UK Minister for Agriculture publicly announcing British beef was perfectly safe to eat to the detection of dioxins in chocolate, all of which occurred in the late 1990s. At this time, GM food products were entering the market and in some instances even labelled as being GM products,...

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There are currently no breeding techniques used to create genetic variations of hair textures. If a person wishes to change their hair texture in any way, they are currently limited to the available hair care products sold for those purposes. ...

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I’m a genetic engineer. I’ve spent 30 years participating as a member of teams of genetic engineers, and I love your question. Most of us do indeed spend a lot of time inside the lab, but we’re not always sitting. Sometimes we dance! ...

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Other than research, our work starts at the design of a plasmid vector that contains a gene cassette that we want to introduce in a plant genome. Once the plasmid vector design is completed, it is synthesized by bringing together several DNA components together thru a bio-chemical reaction. When the plasmid vector is made, the several components are verified by restriction endonuclease digestion reactions and/or thru DNA sequencing. After this verification is completed, the plasmid...

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