QWhy was the research of Árpád János Pusztai disregarded? His results raised important questions to the health and safety of GM foods but he was denounced and not allowed to continue his research. Can you explain? thank you http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

Why was the research of Árpád János Pusztai disregarded? His results raised important questions to the health and safety of GM foods but he was denounced and not allowed to continue his research. Can you explain? thank you http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Árpád_Pusztai

AExpert Answer

The research you reference was addressed by the Royal Society, which is a fellowship of the world's most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.  The Royal Society convened a panel of scientific experts to review the research and found “no convincing evidence of adverse effects from GM potatoes,” due in part to a number of flaws in study design, execution and analysis. You can find the highlights and full repor,t conducted in 1999, here.

 

The panel also pointed out that this research was conducted on “one particular species of animal, when fed with one particular product, modified by the insertion of one particular gene by one particular method.”  It would be very difficult to base conclusions about the overall impact of GM foods and health on the results from this study or any other single study.

 

In contrast, there have been thousands of studies done on GM crops and their impact on human food safety, animal food safety and the environment. The overwhelming body of evidence has shown the safety of GM crops and food produced from them. For example, the Biofortified website includes a database of peer-reviewed reports in the scientific literature which document the general safety and nutritional wholesomeness of GM foods and feeds. Visit the database here for more details.

Posted on January 31, 2018
Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and... Read More
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Posted on March 1, 2018
I’m a Monsanto scientist who has more than 20 years of experience with genetic modification of plants. I will try to answer your question, even though I don’t ever do experiments on animals, certainly not on humans, of course! Can humans be genetically modified…but a much bigger question is should humans be genetically modified? There are two ways to think about genetic modification of humans (or any animal). One way is modification of somatic cells, and the other is the... Read More
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Posted on May 10, 2017
The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). Plant agglutinins (or lectins) and amylase inhibitors are examples of anti-nutritional compounds that may be present in crops. The relevance of such a... Read More