QWhy shouldnt nonGMO food be labeled instead? Much easier, smaller group, and more relevant to those who are concerned.

Why shouldnt nonGMO food be labeled instead? Much easier, smaller group, and more relevant to those who are concerned.

AExpert Answer

Several options for retailers to voluntarily label non-GMO products already exist in the marketplace. In fact, Gregory Conko, senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, discusses available options to label non-GMO products in another post. An excerpt is below, but we encourage you to read his entire response.

“Some consumers wish to avoid foods with genetically engineered ingredients, so food producers have increasingly responded to this market demand by labeling food products that do not contain them. There are many thousands of voluntarily labeled, non-GE foods available in grocery stores throughout the country, in stores as varied as Whole Foods Markets and Walmart. From just 2000 to 2009, nearly 7,000 new food and beverage products were introduced in the United States with explicit non-GE labeling. And those numbers continue to grow. 

“In addition, groups ranging from Greenpeace to the Organic Consumers Association to the Non-GMO Project have created websites, print pocket guides, and even smartphone apps that help shoppers identify ‘GE-free’ products. And certified organic foods may not be produced with genetically engineered ingredients. So, in cases where a ‘GE-free’ labeled product is unavailable, shoppers can choose certified organic products instead. In short, consumers have at their disposal an abundance of information directing them to affirmatively labeled non-GE products and providing ample choice in the marketplace.”

You can read more about how products following USDA organic regulations are non-GMO at this link

If you have any additional questions, please ask.

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