Qwhen will we start seeing GMO content itemized in the food labels?

when will we start seeing GMO content itemized in the food labels?

AExpert Answer

Depending on where you live and shop, you can see these labels now. There are a number of countries that have mandatory GMO labeling regimes, though not all of these laws are equal. Many of them exempt products or GMO labeling at certain locations, such as restaurants. They have different percentage triggers, meaning some require labels if more than .9% of the content consists of GMO ingredients, while others don’t require a label until the level is above 5%. And, not all of them are equally enforced. However, if you are curious about what a GMO label looks like, please see this previously posted response on our site: http://gmoanswers.com/ask/someone-claims-61-countries-require-gmo-labeling-what-does-gmo-label-look-likewhat-sufficient.

 

In the U.S., since we have a voluntary system, we currently recommend you look for non-GMO labels or certified “USDA Organic” if you want to avoid GMO ingredients.

Posted on August 15, 2017
No! However, poor nutrition coupled with highly processed foods and a lack of education regarding healthy eating is bad for our kids. As a mother and farmer, I believe the best way to keep my family safe and healthy is to make sure they eat a balanced diet and make good food choices daily. Fresh, healthy ingredients and minimally processed foods that are low in sugar, salt, calories and cholesterol provide kids with the best opportunity for a healthy diet. Agricultural biotechnology... Read More
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Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
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Posted on March 2, 2017
Here is a set of slides prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) that discusses the sketch approval process. As the slides indicate, there are four categories of labels that require prior sketch approval: temporary labels, religious exemption, exports with labeling deviations, and special statements and claims. In the situation raised by your question, it is the last category (special statements and claims) that would... Read More
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