QWhen Proposition 37 was presented in California, the “No” side of the argument ran a campaign using the tagline, “Stop the Deceptive Food Labeling Scheme”. How exactly is mandatory labeling of GMOs deceptive? Please explain.

When Proposition 37 was presented in California, the “No” side of the argument ran a campaign using the tagline, “Stop the Deceptive Food Labeling Scheme”. How exactly is mandatory labeling of GMOs deceptive? Please explain.

AExpert Answer

Calling the proposal to label food containing GMOs deceptive is typical of the type of language used in political campaigns.  It is based on a valid issue but is over-the-top in choice of words to address the issue.  The primary issue is that labeling of food in the United States is done to protect the consumer.  Information is provided that addresses food safety and nutritional issues.  Food produced by molecular genetic modification methods has been carefully screened and tested for safety and nutritional issues and so does not pose a threat to the public.  Food companies are free to label their products as GMO-free, but to force all food to be labeled if it contains GMOs would suggest to the consumer, based on current laws and practice, that the food is not safe.  Those opposed to GMO labeling consider labeling food as if it were not safe, when it is safe, deceptive.

Posted on March 9, 2018
Sun Pacific oranges are not a GM food, in fact all oranges are not a GM crop. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. But there are only 10 commercially available GM crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. Below is a table outlining what year the 10 crops became commercially available:  ... Read More
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Posted on March 8, 2018
That’s a great question because so many people ‘expect’ there to be a difference and taste is purely a subjective assessment. So the answer is – it depends. Examples when the “look” would be different: Golden Rice: his rice has been engineered to be higher in Beta-carotene, using a gene from maize/corn, to help reduce the incidence of Vitamin A deficiency in developing countries whose Vitamin A content in the diet is so low, that results in blindness,... Read More
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Posted on February 28, 2018
On average, GMOs take 13 years and $130 million of research and development before coming to market. We’ve created the below infographic that outlines this process in more detail: The following infographic includes excerpts from more than 600+ safety assessment studies which assess the health and safety of GMOs. You can also read more about the regulatory review and approval process in Wendelyn Jones, Global Regulatory Affairs, DowDuPont Crop Protection’s response to a... Read More
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