Qwhat does GMO stand for?

what does GMO stand for?

AExpert Answer

“GMO” stands for genetically modified organism. GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulin, vitamins, vaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is  focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.  Currently, eight crops are commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.

 

8 crops

 

If you’re interested in learning more about how GM plants are created, check out the video below.

 

 

Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, explains how we can be sure an inserted gene does what it is supposed to do in this post.

 

Both traditional plant breeding and genetic engineering involve altering the genes of a plant to make a better variety.  Breeding involves random mixing of genes from two parent plants which results in a new variety that contains the desired characteristic and possibly other unwanted characteristics.  A GM plant results from the direct transfer of an intended gene that gives the desired characteristic to the new variety.  The graphic below discusses the differences between traditional plant breeding and genetic engineering.

 

methods of plant breeding

 

If you have any additional questions, please ask!

 

Posted on October 18, 2017
GMO Answers provides the facts that answer questions related to biotechnology, GM crops and agriculture. We work to ensure that the content and answers provided by experts and companies are accurate and therefore do not present opinions about GMOs, simply facts. GMO Answers is a community focused on constructive discussion about GMOs in order to have open conversations about agriculture and GMOs.   This website is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information. The... Read More
Posted on September 20, 2017
“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan.    GMO Answers provides the facts that answer questions related to biotechnology, GM crops and agriculture. We work to ensure that the content and answers provided by experts and companies is accurate and therefore do not present opinions about GMOs, simply facts. GMO Answers is a community focused on constructive discussion about GMOs in order to have open conversations about... Read More
Answer:
Posted on September 5, 2017
While there might be some institutions with the capability to make these transgenic watermelon and coconut plants for you, that does not mean that you would be able to actually plant them out. First, the institution would need to have a Biological Use Authorization to work with recombinant DNA to make the vectors to transfer the genes. Then they would need to be able to do the tissue culture required to transfer the genes and regenerate whole plants again, which can sometimes be difficult.... Read More

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