QIve heard quite a few stories about antigmo activists destroying plants that researchers are growing, and how they just as often destroy nongm crops as they do gm ones. Is there any way to distinguish between plants that have been modified by traditional

Ive heard quite a few stories about antigmo activists destroying plants that researchers are growing, and how they just as often destroy nongm crops as they do gm ones. Is there any way to distinguish between plants that have been modified by traditional techniques and those altered by modern ones?

AExpert Answer

You can read about vandalism of GM crops in this post by Karl Haro von Mogel on Biofortified.org.

 

GM and non-GM crops look the same. According to this article from the Los Angeles Times, “[t]o the naked eye, the white puffs of cotton growing on shrubs, the yellow flowers on canola plants and the towering tassels on cornstalks look just like those on any other plants.”

 

If you’re interested in learning more about the different types of methods used to develop new plants, check out the video below from University of Florida professor Kevin Folta:

 

If you have any additional questions, please ask.

Posted on December 7, 2017
The term “GMO” typically refers to crops or animals that, through genetic engineering, have had a gene (or a few genes) from a different species inserted into their genome. This is by design to improve a crop or animal with genetic engineering. In fact, me and my colleagues recently published a paper on this very topic that addresses this very topic and gives more details on the plant selection practices used for GE crops.   However, you pick up on something very... Read More
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Posted on December 7, 2017
Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. However, there are only 10 commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples.   Below is a table outlining what year the nine crops became commercially available:   Squash 1995 Cotton 1996... Read More
Posted on November 28, 2017
There are currently no breeding techniques used to create genetic variations of hair textures. If a person wishes to change their hair texture in any way, they are currently limited to the available hair care products sold for those purposes.   However, new gene editing techniques are continued to be developed for different beneficial purposes and what you are referring to is the possibility of editing genes in humans. Some of the areas to apply gene editing, particularly in humans, are... Read More
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