QMy question pertains to the genetic modification of Roundup Ready soybeans. How is it that this process occurs? Id like to know the specific steps used from the targeting of specific genes at the start to the finished product. Thank you

My question pertains to the genetic modification of Roundup Ready soybeans. How is it that this process occurs? Id like to know the specific steps used from the targeting of specific genes at the start to the finished product. Thank you

AExpert Answer

The basic steps are as follows:

 

  1. Identify a gene that will provide resistance to the herbicide.
  2. Based on the sequence of the resistant gene, make a DNA expression cassette that contains a promoter to turn on the gene, the resistant gene, and a sequence to stop gene transcription. 
  3. Transform the plant in tissue culture to incorporate the resistant gene
  4. Screen for plants that have successfully incorporated the resistant gene and are tolerant to glyphosate.

A very good detailed description of the process is already available at http://sandwalk.blogspot.com/2007/03/roundup-ready-transgenic-plants.html.  Additional details about Roundup Ready soybeans are also available in the USDA petition for deregulation at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/brs/aphisdocs/93_25801p.pdf.

 

If you have additional questions, I would be happy to answer them. 

Posted on September 5, 2017
While there might be some institutions with the capability to make these transgenic watermelon and coconut plants for you, that does not mean that you would be able to actually plant them out. First, the institution would need to have a Biological Use Authorization to work with recombinant DNA to make the vectors to transfer the genes. Then they would need to be able to do the tissue culture required to transfer the genes and regenerate whole plants again, which can sometimes be difficult.... Read More
Posted on June 28, 2017
The short answer is no, neither MSG or animal extraction are from GMOs, nor is MSG, animal extraction, or animal products/animal DNA in GMOs.   When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering (also called GE). It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant... Read More
Answer:
Posted on June 28, 2017
No. MSG, monosodium glutamate, is a chemical additive, certainly not a GMO.
Answer: