QI've seen in some of your responses that you support labeling of GM products. Will you support I-522?

I've seen in some of your responses that you support labeling of GM products. Will you support I-522?

AExpert Answer

As you mention, we support voluntary, market-based labeling. It¹s also important that any label be consistent and science based.

 

I-522 is a Washington State initiative that does not meet those criteria.  It isn’t market-based, voluntary and certainly isn’t based on science.  In addition, I-522's poorly written requirements and special exemptions would provide inconsistent and misleading information to consumers about the foods they buy. These are the reasons many of our member companies are part of a broad and growing coalition of Washington scientists, doctors, family farmers, food producers, grocers, businesses and citizens who oppose I-522. To learn more about the coalition’s perspective, visit www.FactsAbout522.com.

 

In addition, you might be interested in some of my previous responses where I’ve outlined our position on labeling in more detail (see here and here).

Posted on April 11, 2018
Interesting question - that's a good example of how the term "GMO" (genetically modified organism) is too vague to be really useful. In a sense, yes, your genes are modified compared to both of your parents. And you're definitely not genetically identical to your parents (unless you're a yeast, or a starfish, or a willow tree, or some other organism that can reproduce asexually).   But in common usage, the term GMO refers to an organism containing a gene... Read More
Posted on March 9, 2018
Sun Pacific oranges are not a GM food, in fact all oranges are not a GM crop. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. But there are only 10 commercially available GM crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. Below is a table outlining what year the 10 crops became commercially available:  ... Read More
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Posted on March 8, 2018
That’s a great question because so many people ‘expect’ there to be a difference and taste is purely a subjective assessment. So the answer is – it depends. Examples when the “look” would be different: Golden Rice: his rice has been engineered to be higher in Beta-carotene, using a gene from maize/corn, to help reduce the incidence of Vitamin A deficiency in developing countries whose Vitamin A content in the diet is so low, that results in blindness,... Read More
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