QIs it ethical, and why is it necessary, for an industry that claims to be based on science to be so active in PR campaigns to persuade the public to accept their science? Isn't solid science based on objectivity and neutrality, not corporate interest and

Is it ethical, and why is it necessary, for an industry that claims to be based on science to be so active in PR campaigns to persuade the public to accept their science? Isn't solid science based on objectivity and neutrality, not corporate interest and marketing?

AExpert Answer

Thanks for your questions. I answered them in reverse order.

 

We launched GMO Answers to provide one place where anyone could find information or ask questions about GMOs. Some of the information is ours―for example, the facts that are presented in our Explore the Basics section. However, you’ll also see reference to peer-reviewed “solid science” and answers from independent, third-party experts in response to the scientific questions we are being asked.

 

We aren’t trying to persuade visitors about the science, but instead want to enable visitors to make up their own minds about GMOs.

 

Why is GMO Answers necessary? From my perspective, for two reasons: In the United States, for about three years now, the conversation about GMOs has been elevated to a national level, due to what we believe is the spreading of unfounded fears and misinformation about GMOs. During this time, the conversation about our GM seeds, and the crops and food grown and made from them, was going on without us. We wanted our voice to be heard. In addition, we had been asked frequently about whether there was one place folks could go to read differing opinions about GMOs. The Ask Your Question section is a feast for the eyes in this regard.

 

Is it ethical? I believe any time someone provides, in good faith, cited and credible information about an issue, whether or not he or she is invested in the issue, it is ethical. But, in the spirit of GMO Answers, I ask you to make up your own mind about this.

Posted on August 15, 2017
The first use of recombinant DNA technology, was created by Cohen and Boyer in 1972 with E.coli in 1972 and this article explains this advancement in biotechnology in greater detail. Here is an excerpt: “Their experiments dramatically demonstrated the potential impact of DNA recombinant engineering on medicine and pharmacology, industry and agriculture.”   Recombinant insulin was the first commercial product derived from genetic engineering techniques created in 1976 by the... Read More
Posted on August 15, 2017
The first use of recombinant DNA technology, was created by Cohen and Boyer in 1972 with E.coli in 1972 and this article explains this advancement in biotechnology in greater detail. Here is an excerpt: “Their experiments dramatically demonstrated the potential impact of DNA recombinant engineering on medicine and pharmacology, industry and agriculture.”   Recombinant insulin was the first commercial product derived from genetic engineering techniques created in 1976 by the... Read More
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There are no genetically modified squirrels. The GM salmon was recently approved by the FDA and is the first GMO food animal to be approved. The salmon was genetically modified for a few reasons including conserving wild fish populations and providing low impact aquaculture. Read more about this first GMO animal, why and how it was created.   You might also be interested in the genetic engineering for “de-extinction.” For more information on this concept, here is a previous... Read More