QIs it ethical, and why is it necessary, for an industry that claims to be based on science to be so active in PR campaigns to persuade the public to accept their science? Isn't solid science based on objectivity and neutrality, not corporate interest and

Is it ethical, and why is it necessary, for an industry that claims to be based on science to be so active in PR campaigns to persuade the public to accept their science? Isn't solid science based on objectivity and neutrality, not corporate interest and marketing?

AExpert Answer

Thanks for your questions. I answered them in reverse order.

 

We launched GMO Answers to provide one place where anyone could find information or ask questions about GMOs. Some of the information is ours―for example, the facts that are presented in our Explore the Basics section. However, you’ll also see reference to peer-reviewed “solid science” and answers from independent, third-party experts in response to the scientific questions we are being asked.

 

We aren’t trying to persuade visitors about the science, but instead want to enable visitors to make up their own minds about GMOs.

 

Why is GMO Answers necessary? From my perspective, for two reasons: In the United States, for about three years now, the conversation about GMOs has been elevated to a national level, due to what we believe is the spreading of unfounded fears and misinformation about GMOs. During this time, the conversation about our GM seeds, and the crops and food grown and made from them, was going on without us. We wanted our voice to be heard. In addition, we had been asked frequently about whether there was one place folks could go to read differing opinions about GMOs. The Ask Your Question section is a feast for the eyes in this regard.

 

Is it ethical? I believe any time someone provides, in good faith, cited and credible information about an issue, whether or not he or she is invested in the issue, it is ethical. But, in the spirit of GMO Answers, I ask you to make up your own mind about this.

Posted on September 5, 2017
While there might be some institutions with the capability to make these transgenic watermelon and coconut plants for you, that does not mean that you would be able to actually plant them out. First, the institution would need to have a Biological Use Authorization to work with recombinant DNA to make the vectors to transfer the genes. Then they would need to be able to do the tissue culture required to transfer the genes and regenerate whole plants again, which can sometimes be difficult.... Read More
Posted on August 5, 2017
I’m a genetic engineer. I’ve spent 30 years participating as a member of teams of genetic engineers, and I love your question. Most of us do indeed spend a lot of time inside the lab, but we’re not always sitting. Sometimes we dance!   Genetic engineering starts with an idea for a way to solve a problem, so I guess it starts with an understanding of the problems. In agriculture, for example, that means spending time to understand what’s happening on farms and... Read More
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Posted on August 5, 2017
Other than research, our work starts at the design of a plasmid vector that contains a gene cassette that we want to introduce in a plant genome. Once the plasmid vector design is completed, it is synthesized by bringing together several DNA components together thru a bio-chemical reaction. When the plasmid vector is made, the several components are verified by restriction endonuclease digestion reactions and/or thru DNA sequencing. After this verification is completed, the plasmid... Read More
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