QI still haven't heard a good reason why GMO foods should not be labelled, but I think everyone one knows that there is only one reason, it would kill sales. If it wouldn't kill sales you would not be spending a cent on a web site and large amounts of mone

I still haven't heard a good reason why GMO foods should not be labelled, but I think everyone one knows that there is only one reason, it would kill sales. If it wouldn't kill sales you would not be spending a cent on a web site and large amounts of money to stop GMO labeling bills. You really show your true colors when you start suing small farmers because your GMO seeds blew onto their land. Is your only answer to making "agent orange" that it was for war so it is not important if it killed people. Large corporations like Monsanto are only concerned about one thing, the bottom line. Is it profitable? Morality is not a factor in choosing the products you make. I'm sure you are doing very well.

AExpert Answer

Let me start by saying that I am proud to work for Monsanto and am glad to address each of the issues in your question. 

 

  • Labeling—First of all, we are supportive of any voluntary labeling mechanism (e.g., organic or GMO-free) that is desired by consumers. Any company is free to make claims—if truthful and not misleading—that its products are free of GMOs.
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA) policy is that labeling is required if there is a meaningful difference between a GM food and its conventional counterpart. We oppose mandatory labeling of food and ingredients developed from GM seeds in the absence of any demonstrated risks, as it could be interpreted as a warning or imply that food products containing these ingredients are somehow inferior. There is a great article in Scientific American that articulates this well.
  • Suing farmers—Monsanto has never sued a farmer in the situation that you described. We have a long-standing public commitment that “it has never been, nor will it be, Monsanto’s policy to exercise its patent rights where trace amounts of our patented seeds or traits are present in a farmer’s fields as a result of inadvertent means.”
  • Agent Orange—War is tragic, and the Agent Orange story is complicated. There have been several court rulings stating that the companies that produced Agent Orange under contract of the government for the Vietnam War are not responsible for any implications.
Posted on March 9, 2018
Sun Pacific oranges are not a GM food, in fact all oranges are not a GM crop. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. But there are only 10 commercially available GM crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. Below is a table outlining what year the 10 crops became commercially available:  ... Read More
Answer:
Posted on March 8, 2018
That’s a great question because so many people ‘expect’ there to be a difference and taste is purely a subjective assessment. So the answer is – it depends. Examples when the “look” would be different: Golden Rice: his rice has been engineered to be higher in Beta-carotene, using a gene from maize/corn, to help reduce the incidence of Vitamin A deficiency in developing countries whose Vitamin A content in the diet is so low, that results in blindness,... Read More
Answer:
Posted on February 28, 2018
On average, GMOs take 13 years and $130 million of research and development before coming to market. We’ve created the below infographic that outlines this process in more detail: The following infographic includes excerpts from more than 600+ safety assessment studies which assess the health and safety of GMOs. You can also read more about the regulatory review and approval process in Wendelyn Jones, Global Regulatory Affairs, DowDuPont Crop Protection’s response to a... Read More
Answer: