QI am a farmer growing rice in India. I understand rice emits 10-15% of Methane Gas Emission. Though it is relatively a small percentage of Green House Gas at Global level,it is significant at National level. Is it possible develop GMO rice using the tool

I am a farmer growing rice in India. I understand rice emits 10-15% of Methane Gas Emission. Though it is relatively a small percentage of Green House Gas at Global level,it is significant at National level. Is it possible develop GMO rice using the tools of AgriBioTechnology which would prevent rice from transmitting CH4 around the root zone in to the atmosphere through it's aerenchyma cells?

AExpert Answer

There is often more than one solution to a challenge; and similar to corn and other crops, a farmer could most effectively address this specific challenge through a systems approach. For example, there are a number of reports out of China that support farmers changing their agronomic practices to reduce emissions. There seems to be a growing consensus that mid-season drainage decreases the emissions from rice paddy fields as long as nitrogen is applied in appropriate doses. According to calculations, midseason drainage generally tends to be an effective option for mitigating emissions, although 15 to 20 percent of the benefit gained by decreasing methane emission was offset by the increase in N2O emission. (See http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/focus16_03.pdf.) Studies also show that application of manure and blue green algae not only recorded higher yield, but were also found to emit less methane in paddy cultivation than the application of manure alone. http://www.bioforsk.no/ikbViewer/Content/100861/13_TB_Photosynthesis.pdf

 

In addition, scientists believe that there are genetic ways to increase yield through breeding and/or transgenics and that this will also reduce methane output.  There is ongoing research on changing the photosynthesis of rice to be more like corn.  This is expected to increase uptake of CO2 and may reduce methane production (see http://homepage.agron.ntu.edu.tw/~menchi/2010%[email protected]%aa%ab%be%c7%afS%bd%d7/Strategies%20to%20lower%20greenhouse%20gas%20level%20by%20rice.pdf).

 

Monsanto is proud to support research on rice in developing countries.  Monsanto announced in 2009 that we were contributing $10 million to establish Monsanto’s Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Program, which will identify and support young scientists interested in improving research and production in rice and wheat since these are staple crops in developing countries, providing essential calories to feed billions of people every day. Many of the world’s poorest people rely on the two grains as a key source of food.

Posted on January 31, 2018
Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and... Read More
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Posted on March 1, 2018
I’m a Monsanto scientist who has more than 20 years of experience with genetic modification of plants. I will try to answer your question, even though I don’t ever do experiments on animals, certainly not on humans, of course! Can humans be genetically modified…but a much bigger question is should humans be genetically modified? There are two ways to think about genetic modification of humans (or any animal). One way is modification of somatic cells, and the other is the... Read More
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Posted on May 10, 2017
The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). Plant agglutinins (or lectins) and amylase inhibitors are examples of anti-nutritional compounds that may be present in crops. The relevance of such a... Read More