Qdo food labels reveal if they are gmo

do food labels reveal if they are gmo

AExpert Answer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not require mandatory labeling for GMO ingredients in foods unless the resulting food product is changed or different in some way from its non-GMO counterpart. For example if the food is changed nutritionally or if an allergen is newly present these changes must be indicated on the label. The rationale for this labeling policy is two-fold:

 

  • GMO ingredients have been deemed the same as their conventional counterparts by the FDA based on input from leading regulatory and science bodies that have evaluated GMO ingredients. 
  • U.S. labeling policies are and have always been based on the nutrition or safety of the food rather than how the food is grown or produced. Since ingredients derived from plants that were genetically modified are safe and not nutritionally different, there is no reason to label. 

Food companies are able to voluntarily label their products as containing GMOs or are free of GMOs if it is true and verifiable. Also, under the organic standards regulations, GMO ingredients are not allowed to be used if a product makes an organic claim. Consumers must be aware that not all products labeled GMO-free are necessarily organic but all products labeled organic are in fact GMO-free.

Posted on June 13, 2018
The good news is that no genetically modified food has animal genes in it. There are currently only 10 crops that are developed with GM technology, they are - alfalfa, apples, canola, corn (field and sweet), cotton, papaya, potatoes, soybeans, squash and sugar beets. Alfalfa and feed corn are often fed to animals but all studies of dairy, eggs and milk from these animals has never found any indication of the GM feed, in other words, the animal digests that crop in the same manner as any other... Read More
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Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More
Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More