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Posted On: Friday, 3/28/2014 3:52 pm
A: Thanks for your question, Joanne! I'm a squash breeder who is responsible for developing new hybrids of both GM and non-GM zucchini, and I've had 14 years of experience in observing both, side by side, and in many growing environments. In all those years of observations, I've never found any trait that differentiates the GM and non-GM products. They look and grow exactly the same, except for when it comes to their reaction to infection by viruses. There are many different types of squash... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 7/01/2014 10:18 pm
A: The presidential memo outlined a multi-stakeholder initiative to coordinate resources on addressing the multiple factors that are acknowledged as responsible for declining bee health, particularly improving pollinator habitat. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as only one of the multiple government departments involved, was instructed to “assess the effect of pesticides, including neonicotinoids, on bee and other pollinator health,” which is an appropriate and ongoing part of its... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Thursday, 4/24/2014 11:28 pm
A: I'm a scientist and educator, so it is really important for me that our public understands science and technology. It is hard to see a good technology that has been used with an amazing safety and efficacy record get trashed.  So that's why I dip my toe into the discussion. We don't "think they are safe"; when we look at the data, there is no evidence to the contrary after 17 years on the market.  I can't speak for others, but I see this technology as a great way to solve problems... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 4/23/2014 8:54 pm
A: As Greg Wandrey, director for stewardship and compliance at DuPont Pioneer, points out, "in fact, the number of countries that don't allow the cultivation of biotech crops is small."   He says, "Biotech crops are cultivated or imported in so many countries because they: 1. benefit farmers ($98 billion additional income for farmers since 1996); 2. benefit the planet (saved greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to removing 10 million cars); and 3. are safe. GM crops are some of the most... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Saturday, 3/01/2014 2:35 pm
A: Thank you for posting your question concerning pollination restrictions and the effects on GMOs in the U.S. Farmers can grow organic, GM and conventional crops in the same area, and in fact, many growers use all three of these types of farming practices on the same farm and do grow organic corn next to GM corn. In order to minimize pollen flow between these crops, growers utilize many management practices. For example, farmers may plant at recommended separation distances, time their... Continue Reading

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