Ask Us Anything About GMOs!

Browse all Questions & Answers

Filter Questions

Reset Filter

Voting Closed
Posted On: Tuesday, 4/08/2014 1:13 pm
A: If you have a question about a specific company’s product, please visit the company’s website. The only GMOs commercially available in the U.S. are the following eight crops: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), papaya, canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets and summer squash. Many beverages contain high-fructose corn syrup and/or sugar, which can be derived from GM corn and GM sugar beets, respectively. Continue Reading
Voting Closed
Posted On: Saturday, 4/05/2014 6:19 pm
A: You can read about vandalism of GM crops in this post by Karl Haro von Mogel on Biofortified.org. GM and non-GM crops look the same. According to this article from the Los Angeles Times, “[t]o the naked eye, the white puffs of cotton growing on shrubs, the yellow flowers on canola plants and the towering tassels on cornstalks look just like those on any other plants.” If you’re interested in learning more about the different types of methods used to develop new plants, check out the video... Continue Reading
Voting Closed
Posted On: Thursday, 9/26/2013 11:25 pm
A: Based on your question, it seems that you are skeptical about the intentions and awareness of those of us who have dedicated our lives to researching and developing GM crops. I’d like to address your question based on my personal experience. I grew up in southeastern Arkansas, in a small farming town named Dumas, where my grandfather, uncles and cousins were and still are farmers. I worked in the cotton fields every summer, scouting for insect pests so farmers knew when to apply... Continue Reading
Voting Closed
Posted On: Wednesday, 3/12/2014 1:38 pm
A: Your question could be answered in various ways depending upon how one interprets it.  We use GM seeds for growing both corn and soybeans here on our farm.  The benefits of biotech seeds include the reality that we now are using less pesticides and other chemicals on our crops, as well as the fact that it allows us to use less tillage (break-up) of the soil. This means less land erosion, a very good plus for the environment. In my opinion, the biggest problem with the seeds is... Continue Reading
Voting Closed
Posted On: Tuesday, 3/25/2014 4:00 pm
A: This is an important question, and a common one on GMO Answers. There are several uses for GMOs, and we would like to share a few of them with you. You might be interested in this video about the rainbow papaya and how GMO technology helped save the Hawaiian papaya industry.Also, the graphic below details what GM traits are used in crops in the United States, including herbicide tolerance, disease resistance and insect resistance.  If you have any additional questions, please... Continue Reading

Pages