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Posted On: Thursday, 4/24/2014 11:28 pm
A: I'm a scientist and educator, so it is really important for me that our public understands science and technology. It is hard to see a good technology that has been used with an amazing safety and efficacy record get trashed.  So that's why I dip my toe into the discussion. We don't "think they are safe"; when we look at the data, there is no evidence to the contrary after 17 years on the market.  I can't speak for others, but I see this technology as a great way to solve problems... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Monday, 3/31/2014 8:17 am
A: I answered a similar question about the claim that Sri Lanka banned glyphosate in this response.
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Posted On: Thursday, 2/27/2014 1:38 pm
A: Drinking water can come from two sources: a public water system that provides drinking water to approximately 90 percent of Americans, or private drinking-water wells. Groundwater or surface waters (lakes, rivers and streams) are the sources of drinking water. There are a number of management practices that farmers use to limit the movement of glyphosate herbicides and other pesticide tools in both ground- and surface-water sources of drinking water. There are two ways in which pesticides... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Friday, 3/07/2014 10:52 am
A: I have been around many folks who have eaten food derived from GMO crops since they were introduced in the mid-1990s, including my family, and I have not heard anyone comment on their tasting bad. (Now, brussels sprouts (which are not technically GMOs but did result from quite a bit of genetic modification) are a different matter—lots of complaints there.) From personal experience with eating a range of foods that are GMO (like Bt sweet corn right out of the field, virus-resistant papaya... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Thursday, 4/24/2014 10:02 am
A: Currently, eight crops from GM seeds are commercially available in the United States: corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash. It is also worth noting that no commercially available crops in the United States were created by nature alone. Humans, over our history, have altered all of our crops, often for taste or yield or disease resistance. More information about the history of crop modification is available in our Explore... Continue Reading

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