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Posted On: Tuesday, 7/30/2013 4:25 pm
A: While there is some evidence that in laboratory studies neonicotinoid exposure can affect honeybee behavior, many field studies have been conducted, and all report no adverse effects on honeybee colonies in real-world agricultural settings. In the field, typical exposure levels are very low and there is no scientific evidence linking these very low-level exposures to colony losses or declining colony health. Likewise, there is no correlation between where neonicotinoid products are used... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 7/30/2013 4:25 pm
A: Neonicotinoids (e.g., imidacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam) are widely used in agricultural landscapes as a systemic, broad-spectrum insecticide. Neonicotinoids are used more than any other class of insecticide worldwide and are frequently found in seed coatings, foliar sprays and granular formulations. While their toxicity to humans is low, their prevalence of use among farmers and homeowners has raised concern over the level of exposure to pollinators and other nontarget insects.... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 5/21/2014 11:42 am
A: GMOs are not contributing to the death of non-pest species of butterflies.  Some types of Bt proteins are purposefully targeted to kill particular moth and butterfly species.  These Bt proteins can be produced by plants when they are genetically modified.  However, this targeting is intentionally aimed for moth or butterfly pest species that would be killed using insecticide sprays if Bt were not used.  Bt proteins are very specific in this regard.  Some non-pest... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 5/21/2014 11:42 am
A: The decline in milkweed and monarch butterfly populations has been discussed on GMO Answers. Andrew Kniss, associate professor of weed ecology and management at the University of Wyoming, explores the factors contributing to the decline in monarchs returning to their overwintering sites in Mexico, as well as the loss of milkweed habitat. While an excerpt is below, we encourage you to read his full post, “Are herbicides responsible for the decline in monarch butterflies?” “The monarch... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Thursday, 2/27/2014 1:38 pm
A: Drinking water can come from two sources: a public water system that provides drinking water to approximately 90 percent of Americans, or private drinking-water wells. Groundwater or surface waters (lakes, rivers and streams) are the sources of drinking water. There are a number of management practices that farmers use to limit the movement of glyphosate herbicides and other pesticide tools in both ground- and surface-water sources of drinking water. There are two ways in which pesticides... Continue Reading

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