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Posted On: Saturday, 3/22/2014 11:59 am
A: Please refer to this response.
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Posted On: Tuesday, 10/01/2013 10:54 am
A: This question includes an interesting observation and is one that every country that grows GM crops asks. Regulating agencies are very interested in making sure GM crops are compositionally the same as non-GM and that the gene does not negatively affect the plant. As you point out, honey production is an important aspect of canola production, and thus companies make sure that the plants used to develop GM varieties will still produce nectar. Canada is the second-largest grower of canola (the... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 7/30/2013 11:19 pm
A: Numerous factors can negatively impact honey bee health. Major concerns include the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, bee viruses, bacterial disease, nutrition, gut microbes, hive management practices and pesticide exposure. Read more on the state of honey bee health in this report issued by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Bee health is accepted by the scientific community as a complex issue with no single factor responsible for the decline of the bee population... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 7/30/2013 8:39 pm
A: Bee health is an important issue for everyone, and the research-based learning network site eXtensionprovides an excellent summary of the issue. Major concerns include the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, bee viruses, bacterial disease, nutrition, gut microbes, hive management practices and pesticide exposure. Genetically modified (GM) plants and their impact on honey bees have been widely studied, and the results indicate that GM plants are not harmful to bees. A 2001 review... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 1/01/2014 1:22 pm
A: Many claims have been made on the Internet that use of glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops and glyphosate can change the composition of soil because glyphosate is a strong chelator- a compound that can bind with metal ions- that will bind to micronutrients in soil. It is also claimed that this will increase the potential for disease to affect plants, or even cause new pathogenic bacteria to be present in the soil that can affect plant, animal and human health. These have all been used as reasons... Continue Reading