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Posted On: Friday, 1/10/2014 8:49 am
A: For more information on this topic, please review this recent response from David Tribe, Senior Lecturer, Agriculture and Food Systems/Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Melbourne: http://gmoanswers.com/ask/i-recently-looked-article-states-new-genetically-modified-wheat-can-silence-wheat-genes-and-can.
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Posted On: Thursday, 8/08/2013 10:10 am
A: I’m not aware of the situation you reference in your first question. But I do know that cross-pollination between commercial hybrids and native varieties has occurred since the advent of commercial hybrids and is a natural process. Mexican growers have improved native varieties by selecting traits best suited to their production requirements, including traits introduced through commercial maize hybrids. However, native seed varieties also are preserved and stored both internationally and at... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Thursday, 8/08/2013 10:10 am
A: I’m not aware of the situation you reference in your first question. But I do know that cross-pollination between commercial hybrids and native varieties has occurred since the advent of commercial hybrids and is a natural process. Mexican growers have improved native varieties by selecting traits best suited to their production requirements, including traits introduced through commercial maize hybrids. However, native seed varieties also are preserved and stored both internationally and at... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 7/31/2013 1:42 pm
A: The facts do not support the idea that GM crops are more heavily reliant on petroleum than conventional or organic crops. One of the largest uses of petroleum in agriculture is for running machinery across fields to mechanically control weeds through tillage operations. Prior to the introduction of GM herbicide-tolerant crops, farmers were already adopting reduced tillage practices, which were made possible with the availability of selective postemergent herbicides that could be used on... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 9/11/2013 2:44 pm
A: Food prices include several costs. Since humans rarely directly consume corn or soybeans, this answer refers to processed food products. Food prices are affected by increases in corn or soybean prices, but also by other costs, such as wages and transportation. For example, foods that have to be shipped or hauled long distances will be affected when the cost of fuel rises. GM crops have increased the supply of corn and soybeans so the rise in food prices is lower than the case if GM... Continue Reading