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Posted On: Tuesday, 5/27/2014 7:07 pm
A: Genetically engineered crops are digested by animals in the same way as conventional crops. Numerous scientific studies have examined the digestive fate of genetically engineered DNA and protein introduced intro genetically engineered feed (see the Federation of Animal Science Societies Communications website for a comprehensive listing.) Genetically engineered DNA, or the novel proteins encoded therein, have never been detected in the milk, meat or eggs derived from animals fed... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 4/30/2014 11:04 pm
A: Many small companies and universities can and do create GMOs. The process to create GMOs is well understood and straightforward. However, few have developed commercial GMOs. The challenge is that the expense and expertise necessary for global regulatory approval can be prohibitive (published papers estimate costs to develop and secure regulatory approval for a GMO to be approximately $150 million and up). A large portion of costs is devoted to the safety and environmental studies that are... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 4/15/2014 5:47 pm
A: What is a GMO? A GMO is a plant developed through a process in which a copy of a desired gene or section of genetic material from one plant or organism is placed in another plant. The only GMOs commercially available in the U.S. are the following eight crops: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), papaya, canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets and summer squash. What a GMO isn't: A GMO is not an ingredient. Ingredients in the foods you eat may be made using one or more of the... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 4/15/2014 5:47 pm
A: What is a GMO? A GMO is a plant developed through a process in which a copy of a desired gene or section of genetic material from one plant or organism is placed in another plant. The only GMOs commercially available in the U.S. are the following eight crops: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), papaya, canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets and summer squash.[8 crops image here] -- attachedWhat a GMO isn't: A GMO is not an ingredient. Ingredients in the foods you eat may be... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 8/07/2013 12:22 pm
A: Cereals—oats, barley, rye, wheat, maize, sorghum and others—are an important plant group to the global food supply. Researchers at the John Innes Centre are investigating “the possibility of engineering cereals to associate with nitrogen-fixing bacteria and of delivering this technology through the seed.” This topic is discussed also in an article published in Current Opinion in Plant Biology.Article Reference:Charpenter, M., & Oldroyd, G. (2010). How close... Continue Reading

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