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  • UMCAlumFarmBoy79's picture
    UMCAlumFarmBoy79
    12.05.2013
    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303680404579141741399966328
  • UMCAlumFarmBoy79's picture
    UMCAlumFarmBoy79
    12.05.2013
    *and so on have found nothing wrong with genetic modification. Sorry for the typo.
  • UMCAlumFarmBoy79's picture
    UMCAlumFarmBoy79
    12.05.2013
    Actually, many organizations such as Mayo Clinic, the American Cancer Society, the American Medical Association, the World Health Organization, Health Canada, the European Commission Joint Research Center, the National Academy of Science, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Germany), Iapar (Brazil), Embrapa (Brazil), and so on. There are many that have tried to find something wrong with genetic modification, some places in Europe doing hundreds upon hundreds of independent studies, desperate to find something wrong with them, and have failed. http://www.forbes.com/sites/jonentine/2013/10/14/2000-reasons-why-gmos-are-safe-to-eat-and-environmentally-sustainable/
  • QuestionEverything's picture
    QuestionEverything
    09.10.2013
    This is a comment I posted on another question. I'm not sure how I feel about the long-term safety of GMOs, but I think the labeling issue is drawing too much attention fron the more important issues of safety and sustainability long-term. According to the USDA, 90% of all corn, and 93% of all soybeans planted in the US in 2013 was GM. Any company actively seeking out and paying a premium for the remaining 7-10% is labeling their product "non-GMO" or "Certified Organic" voluntarily. Anything else containing any corn or soy products most likely contains GMOs. Why do we need a giant label on it that says "May contain GMOs"? For perspective, I am a vegetarian, and choose not to consume meat or animal byproducts (which are full of hormones, antibiotics, etc.). It is MY responsibility to READ the ingredient label, and be aware of ingredients (such as gelatin) that some do not know to be animal byproducts. Some baked goods, for example contain animal shortenings, including lard, which many people also have religious objections to eating. It's right there on the ingredient list, though - no need for a "Caution-Contains Pork" label. Anyone with an objection to consuming a particular ingredient (for whatever reason) should arm themselves with the knowledge to evaluate their own food, and not demand that the government force companies to do this for them.
  • Community Manager's picture
    Community Manager
    08.31.2013
    We have received several questions on this topic. Please review the following responses: http://gmoanswers.com/ask/if-you-are-truly-interested-opening-discussion-agree-full-disclosure-any-genetically-modified and http://gmoanswers.com/ask/if-you-say-gmo-so-safe-then-why-all-billions-being-spent-fight-labeling-why-not-just-spend-few You can also learn more about labeling using the search box at the top of the website. If you feel that your question has not been answered in these responses, or if you have additional questions, please ask here: http://gmoanswers.com/ask-your-question