CBI

Kate Hall

Manager, Partnerships and Programs, Food and Agriculture Section, Biotechnology Industry Organization

Kate Hall is the Manager for Partnerships and Programs for the Food and Agriculture Section at the

From this Expert

Posted On: Wednesday, 9/04/2013 1:42 pm
A: I’m going to quibble a little bit with your interpretation of what we’ve said.  As far as I know, we haven’t made any statements indicating that the only reason for a food label is to warn consumers.  There is a lot of information, such as marketing claims, provided on a product package that has nothing to do with safety.  What we have opposed are state labeling initiatives that are meant to disparage products with GMO ingredients.  Supporters... Continue Reading
Posted On: Tuesday, 8/20/2013 7:06 pm
A: Depending on where you live and shop, you can see these labels now. There are a number of countries that have mandatory GMO labeling regimes, though not all of these laws are equal. Many of them exempt products or GMO labeling at certain locations, such as restaurants. They have different percentage triggers, meaning some require labels if more than .9% of the content consists of GMO ingredients, while others don’t require a label until the level is above 5%. And, not all of them are equally... Continue Reading
Posted On: Tuesday, 8/06/2013 4:04 pm
A: I would also be very concerned if a known food allergen, like peanuts, was not listed on a package label. This is a legitimate health and safety issue, and the fact is that FDA requires products containing the 8 foods known to cause 90 percent of food allergies to be labeled as such. These 8 foods are: milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, and soybeans.  The only GMO food in this list that is on the market today is soy. So, if a food product contains GMO soy... Continue Reading
Posted On: Monday, 8/05/2013 11:30 pm
A: I have to admit that I’m a little unsure about what you’re asking.  Ingredients and nutritional values are provided on a food label so that individuals can make informed decisions, including about safety, when purchasing a product. If one of those ingredients is a known allergen (a recognized safety hazard), that ingredient is also highlighted in a separate statement on the package. Perhaps you’re making the assumption that the process of genetically engineering a seed... Continue Reading
Posted On: Saturday, 8/03/2013 1:40 pm
A:  Your question highlights some important issues, especially in terms of communicating to different audiences. The most direct answer to the first part of your question is that it’s the farmer who is the customer buying the product from the seed company, and our companies can only label the products that they actually sell.  This doesn’t mean, though, that we are intentionally hiding information from the end food consumer.  While we acknowledge that our industry has not... Continue Reading

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Community Manager

Moderator for GMOAnswers.com

The GMO Answers Community Manager is the website moderator who helps answer your questions by linking to resources on GMO Answers and other online content which addresses GMOs and

From this Expert

Posted On: Wednesday, 5/21/2014 11:42 am
A: The decline in milkweed and monarch butterfly populations has been discussed on GMO Answers. Andrew Kniss, associate professor of weed ecology and management at the University of Wyoming, explores the factors contributing to the decline in monarchs returning to their overwintering sites in Mexico, as well as the loss of milkweed habitat. While an excerpt is below, we encourage you to read his full post, “Are herbicides responsible for the decline in monarch butterflies?” “The monarch... Continue Reading
Posted On: Thursday, 4/24/2014 10:02 am
A: Currently, eight crops from GM seeds are commercially available in the United States: corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash. It is also worth noting that no commercially available crops in the United States were created by nature alone. Humans, over our history, have altered all of our crops, often for taste or yield or disease resistance. More information about the history of crop modification is available in our Explore... Continue Reading
Posted On: Thursday, 4/24/2014 10:02 am
A:  Cathleen Enright, Executive Director of the Council for Biotechnology Information, answered a similar question about labeling and this coalition’s five core principles. An excerpt is included below: We absolutely do support the right of consumers to choose food that is healthy and nutritious. And although we do not sell food products directly to consumers, we support food companies’ decisions to voluntarily label food products for the presence or absence of GMOs, based on their... Continue Reading
Posted On: Wednesday, 4/23/2014 8:54 pm
A: As Greg Wandrey, director for stewardship and compliance at DuPont Pioneer, points out, "in fact, the number of countries that don't allow the cultivation of biotech crops is small."   He says, "Biotech crops are cultivated or imported in so many countries because they: 1. benefit farmers ($98 billion additional income for farmers since 1996); 2. benefit the planet (saved greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to removing 10 million cars); and 3. are safe. GM crops are some of the most... Continue Reading
Posted On: Monday, 4/21/2014 12:25 pm
A: There are currently eight crops from GM seeds that are commercially available in the United States: corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash. It is also worth noting that no commercially available crops in the United States were created by nature alone. Humans, over our history, have altered all of our crops, often for taste or yield or disease resistance. More information about the history of crop modification is available in our ... Continue Reading

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INFOGRAPHIC: "Contribution of Biotech Crops to Sustainability" from ISAAA

By Community Manager (CBI) on Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 21:51

This infographic from the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA) summarizes how GM crops are contributing to sustainability. Learn more about how GM crops help farmers increase crop productivity, conserve biodiversity, reduce agriculture’s eco-footprint, mitigate climate change and alleviate poverty and hunger.
  • Impact on Environment
  • Impact on Farms
  • Science and GMO Basics
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VIDEO: "Organic" from Australia's The Checkout

By Community Manager (CBI) on Friday, August 8, 2014 - 13:11

In this video, Kirsten Drysdale examines common reasons Australian consumers purchase organic foods, and whether the cost is justified.
  • Impact on Society
  • Science and GMO Basics
  • Labeling
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Top 10 Consumer Questions About GMOs, Answered

By Community Manager (CBI) on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 15:53

GMO Answers conducted a national survey to identify, for the first time, the top questions consumers have about GMOs. We’ve compiled the top 10 questions and reached out to scientists, farmers, doctors and other experts to provide answers. Over the course of the next nine weeks, we’ll post one new response each week, so we hope you’ll check back for new answers and follow us on Twitter at @GMOAnswers, where we’ll tweet new answers as they are posted! You can also find these answers on our Top 10 GMO Questions Pinboard.
  • Safety, Health, and Nutrition
  • Science and GMO Basics
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Experts Respond to General Mills’ Cheerios Announcement

By Community Manager (CBI) on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 03:26

We believe food companies have the right to select the ingredients that are best for their markets, just as farmers have the right to choose the seeds that are right for their businesses. We appreciated General Mills transparency in this regard. General Mills did a good job explaining the change and reinforcing the safety of GMOs. (General Mills’ statements are available online: http://blog.generalmills.com/2014/01/the-one-and-only-cheerios and http://cheerios.com/en/Articles/cheerios-and-gmos. General Mills’ position on GMOs has not changed. (General Mills’ position on GMOs is available online: http://www.generalmills.com/Home/ChannelG/on_biotechnology.aspx. This was a marketing decision.
  • Business Practices
  • Future of GMO
  • Labeling
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Adrianne Massey, Ph.D.

Managing Director, Science and Regulatory Affairs, Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO)

I began my professional career as a Biological Sciences faculty member at N.C. State and then joined the N.C.

From this Expert

Posted On: Wednesday, 7/31/2013 1:04 pm
A: It’s good to see that you know GMOs are subjected to government review, because some people believe there is no regulatory oversight of these crops. I am not sure how the rumor got started that government oversight for GMOs is lax or nonexistent, because nothing could be further from the truth. These crops are subjected to more testing than any other new crop variety, and, as a result, we know more about this set of crops than any of the other crops that plant breeders have developed (and... Continue Reading
No Studies were Found.