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Posted On: Sunday, 5/18/2014 10:00 am
A: Thank you for taking the time to visit GMO Answers, and for your question regarding the approved GM products on the market. As you may know, in the late 20th century, advances in technology enabled scientists to expand the genetic diversity of crops. For decades, dedicated researchers from universities, government and private companies have worked to create safe technologies, including plant biotechnology, that have helped farmers around the globe increase the yield of crops while requiring... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Sunday, 3/16/2014 8:32 pm
A: The report you refer to is by Paz-y-Miño et al. (2007), published in the journal Genetics and Molecular Biology, a small Brazilian journal (impact factor 0.73, so not a well-recognized journal). César Paz-y-Miño has an OK publication record and studies a number of regional issues using his expertise. This report assesses "DNA damage" using what's called a "comet assay," an assay in which cells are placed into an agar matrix and subjected to an electric field. DNA is charged, so it moves to the... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Wednesday, 1/08/2014 8:17 pm
A: Both realize the need to produce more food with fewer inputs — to do more with less. We need more food and better-quality food, made with less water, less pesticide, less labor and less fuel, and with sensitivity to the environment. We need to help those in the developing world.  That's the good news. We are all on the same page.  Those against GMOs need to understand the science and how it is being stopped from helping solve the problems we all have identified. Solutions exist, but... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Tuesday, 4/22/2014 12:33 pm
A: Genes — portions of the chemical abbreviated as DNA — have been moved around from one species to another by humans since the 1970s, and by Mother Nature for eons. In every case, the anticipated outcome has been realized. For example, humans have been moving the gene for insulin from humans to bacteria for almost half a century (and now provide insulin for almost all insulin-dependent diabetics). In every case, the recipient bacteria “read” the human insulin gene recipe and make human insulin.... Continue Reading
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Posted On: Thursday, 5/22/2014 10:41 am
A: Thank you for two excellent questions.  First, “Do all cells in a Bt-containing transgenic plant contain the Bt transgene?  The general answer is yes.  Barring rare mutation or rare chromosomal abnormalities, all somatic cells in a plant contain the same DNA.  The large part of a cereal seed (corn, wheat, oats, rye, rice, etc) is called an endosperm and it has three doses of each gene whereas other cells and tissues contain only two copies.  However it is the same... Continue Reading